Nature’s Fireworks—Dahlias

dahlia

Photo credit: http://www.plantoftheweek.org/week414.shtml

While fireworks burst in the sky here on July fourth, dahlias are bursting into colorful bloom from the ground.

The beautiful Dahlia flower has origins as early as the Aztecs. Before it was the national flower of Mexico, Aztecs used dahlias as a treatment for epilepsy. The discovery of this Aztec Herb was a piece of incredible luck for the students of the history of Medicine and also for botanists.

Dahlias are easy to grow and bloom from mid May until late fall. They are about 6-9 inches and are very showy.

The dahlia’s flowers can be white, yellow, orange, red, pink or purple and are either solid or patterned with different colored stripes or edges. The petals of different varieties of dahlias can be long or short, pointed or round, uniformly or irregularly spaced or curl at the edges.

For centuries flowers have been used in many cultures as the symbolic representations of abstract concepts. They were first used as symbols in a religious context. Different flowers were associated with the various deities of ancient religions or given spiritual meanings in the Medieval era and Renaissance period. It was in the Victorian era that the intricate language of flowers came into being; each flower embodied a different emotion or characteristic used to communicate messages.

The symbolic meaning of the dahlia in the Victorian language of flowers has survived. When given as a gift, the dahlia flower expresses sentiments of dignity and elegance.
Read more: http://www.ehow.com/about_6638599_symbolic-meaning-dahlia-flower.html#ixzz2Y79Z5DKo

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